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How A Business Can Manage and Reduce Scope Creep

 

Scope creep is one of those things you have probably fallen victim to, but not known what exactly it was, why it happened or even realised it was happening to you at the time. It may be not until later that you realised the job you were hired to do in the first place changed significantly along the way. You might have had to do extra work you had not quoted on doing, or found that the end result of the work you have done is totally different to what your client asked you for at the start.

Scope creep causes plenty of digital businesses loss in income and failure to meet deadlines because the job they originally quoted for, was changed by their client. It can start off small, with just a few little additions asked for. Unfortunately, sometimes those little changes lead to bigger changes and then the scope of the job or project is widened completely.

Ways To Manage and Reduce Scope Creep With Better Contracts

Scope creep can be managed successfully by improving the content of signed contracts for services between you and your clients. In these contracts, you should include:

  • A clear and detailed statement about the scope of the job or project. Things such as the number of hours you will work on it, the specific resources which are going to be used, a start and finish date and even the number of pages or words (if relevant) you will create for the project is useful.
  • A statement about what happens if clients ask for changes to the job. Some businesses will let clients make a few changes without asking them for more money, others will not. Decide how many, if any, changes you are willing for your client to make within the project and write this down in the contract.
  • A statement reserving the right to charge your client more if the changes they have asked for are outside the scope of the job description in the contract. Sometimes small changes lead to a large amount of work needing to be done which can cost you plenty in non-chargeable time. Include that you are happy to quote for those changes to be made or that those changes can form the next part of the job, with any additional costs to be paid by your client.

When you notice that scope creep is sneaking into a job you are doing, having professional clear communication between you and your client is really important. They might not actually realise what is happening is costing you time and money. Your client can instead be thinking that what they are asking for is normal and acceptable. If this happens, referring them back to the signed contract between you both is a good idea.  

Disclaimer: The information on this page is general information only and must not be relied on as legal advice. Legal Beagle is not a law firm or a substitute for a law firm. We are unable to provide any kind of advice, explanation, opinion, or recommendation about possible legal rights, remedies, defences, options, selection of legal documents or strategies. 

 

 

 

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Legal Beagle is not a law firm or a substitute for a law firm. We are unable to provide any kind of advice, explanation, opinion, or recommendation about possible legal rights, remedies, defences, options, selection of legal documents or strategies.
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